Finding Family on Facebook

The July/August 2014 issue of American Spirit magazine includes an article titled “Finding Family on Facebook.”

One of the genealogy enthusiasts interviewed for the story was quoted as saying, “If you refuse to engage with social media, you are putting yourself in the same position as people in the early part of the last century who wouldn’t allow a telephone in the house.” Continue reading Finding Family on Facebook

Today’s Obituaries Still Helpful

I read the obituary page, and I bet you do, too. People’s stories are intriguing to us family history buffs whether we knew the deceased or not. An obituary in today’s Minneapolis Star Tribune brought an unexpected item of interest. Continue reading Today’s Obituaries Still Helpful

Potential for Misuse Takes Down IrishGenealogy.ie Database

Today’s issue of The Irish Times reports why the “enhanced” civil records database was removed from the IrishGenealogy.ie website last week. Continue reading Potential for Misuse Takes Down IrishGenealogy.ie Database

“New” Civil Records Indexes Temporarily Unavailable

Late last Friday (July 18), a message was posted at IrishGenealogy.ie announcing “Civil Records Search temporarily unavailable” and that a further update would be provided. No explanation and no further news yet. Continue reading “New” Civil Records Indexes Temporarily Unavailable

Genealis e-Newsletter

I’ve blogged regularly about IGSI’s quarterly journal, The Septs, but wait – there’s more! Continue reading Genealis e-Newsletter

Family Reunion in Friesland

For the next week or so you will see fewer postings here. Bill and I are on our way to the Netherlands — Winsum, Friesland, to be precise – for a family reunion. We will be celebrating “120 years of connection” with second cousins and other extended family there. Over 40 people will be traveling from the United States, a second cousin will fly in from Vietnam, and nearly 200 local Dutch relatives will attend the weekend get-together. Continue reading Family Reunion in Friesland

Minnesota Scottish Fair, July 12

Those of you of Scottish descent or interested in “things Scottish” should make plans to attend the Minnesota Scottish Fair on Saturday, July 12. Continue reading Minnesota Scottish Fair, July 12

“Enhanced” indexes to Ireland’s Civil records now online

In an earlier blog I posted about the planned launch of “enhanced” indexes to Ireland’s civil registration records. On July 3 CIGO (Council of Irish Genealogical Organisations) delivered on its promise, and here’s the link to the new Civil Record database:  http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/. Continue reading “Enhanced” indexes to Ireland’s Civil records now online

Breaking news for O’Reilly Clan

A unique Irish manuscript relating to the history and genealogy of the O’Reilly clan from the Kingdom of Breifne, now County Cavan, was announced in a story by Damian McCarney in the July 4th issue of The Anglo-Celt. Continue reading Breaking news for O’Reilly Clan

Irish Lives Remembered

The July/August issue of Irish Lives Remembered is now available and chock-full of engaging articles. As always, it is online and free at http://www.irishlivesremembered.ie/.

  • Handsome George Clooney is pictured on the cover and his Kilkenny connections detailed inside. The Clooney family left Ireland in about 1854 and settled in Kentucky.
  • Coincidentally (or not), another article in this issue is about “Tracing the Irish in Kentucky.”
  • Tyrone, one of the largest counties in Ireland and the heart of O’Neill lands, is the featured Irish county with 16 pages of resources and articles.
  • Using military records to research post-1901 Australia is another well-covered subject.

My attention was captured by the story of The Kerry Girls: Emigration and the Earl Grey Scheme, a book by Kay Moloney Caball. She writes about:

117 Kerry girls sent to Australia in 1849/1850 from the Workhouses in Dingle (20), Kenmare (25), Killarney (35), and Listowel (37), under the auspices of the Earl Grey ‘Orphan’ scheme. The majority of these teenage girls were not in fact ‘Orphans’ as many had one parent alive. Their emigration has become known as the ‘Earl Grey scheme’ after its principal architect, Earl Grey, Secretary of State for the Colonies at the time of the Great Irish Famine.

Irish Lives Remembered is always good reading, and the July/August issue is no exception.