Goodby to the Ancestry Insider

A faithful blogger has put down his virtual pen and paper. The Ancestry Insider – “unofficial and unauthorized” commenter on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org – announced the end of his online newsletter last week.

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Poor Law Union removals from England

Ancestry.com blogs can be regular sources of historic context about their records. Today’s Ancestry UK posting is an excellent example.

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Buried in Fingal

A new database was launched last week which includes searchable details for 65,000 people buried in the Fingal area, north of Dublin.

Finding your Pennsylvania ancestors

“Millions of Americans have ancestors who lived in Pennsylvania at some point in their lives. Prominent groups of immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania include Germans, Irish, African-Americans, Italians, Swiss, Dutch and Chinese. “

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“named” by Public Profiler

How we love to track surnames! A website developed by geographers at the University College London (UCL) is another tool for finding where in the UK your ancestors migrated (or stayed).

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Griffith’s Valuation class

As every Irish family history researcher quickly learns, very few pre-1901 census records survive. Instead we must squeeze out every morsel of information from land surveys completed by Richard Griffiths between 1847 and 1865.

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Historical U.S. county boundary maps

As I researched my Revolutionary-era ancestors through multiple Pennsylvania counties, I thought they kept migrating west. From Lancaster County to Cumberland County to Bedford County to Westmoreland County. Turns out the county boundary lines moved more often than my ancestors.

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“Beta” Minnesota People Records Search

If you research births or deaths in the state of Minnesota, you’ll be happy to hear about the “beta” version of “People Records Search” on the Minnesota Historical Society (MnHS) website.

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The Family Tree Irish Genealogy Guide

The front cover of the May/June 2017 Family Tree Magazine boasts “Discover Your Irish Roots.”

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Free days at Findmypast.com

“Findmypast is encouraging fledgling family historians to start their journey of discovery by providing five days of free access to their entire collection of birth, marriage, death and census records.”

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