New England Catholic records – free webinar

Are you researching Catholic ancestors from Massachusetts or elsewhere in New England? Have you heard about the Historic Catholic Records Online project? Then you’ll be interested in this free webinar.

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Back door to FamilySearch

Lots of blogging about FamilySearch during the past week or so, and here’s more.

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Another July 4th special: Irish newspapers

New subscribers to the Irish Newspaper Archives can get a 50% discount through July 7th!

Search Ancestry 13-colony records for free

Another Independence Day special: Ancestry is offering free access to records from the original 13 colonies, until 11 pm (CDT) July 4.

See the Fourth of July collection here: http://search.ancestry.com/search/group/us_july4th?

Independence from incomplete family tree

The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) suggests you “declare your independence this holiday week from an incomplete family tree. Search and browse free among 1.4 BILLION names on AmericanAncestors.org, the award-winning website of NEHGS.”

Until 10:59 pm (CDT) on Thursday, July 6, “you’ll have complete freedom to roam” on all its online databases.

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Get the most out of FamilySearch

With the upcoming Fourth of July holiday weekend, it’s not too early to start thinking about Irish Saturday, July 9, 2017. Irish Genealogical Society Intl (IGSI) sponsors classes and volunteer research assistance on the second Saturday (of most months).

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Take a dip in Familysearch

“New FamilySearch enhanced civil registration collection holds enhanced detail,” says the Irish Genealogy News (IGN) headline.

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Free Findmypast weekend

Findmypast is offering free access to its British and Irish records this weekend, June 22-26.

Black sheep in your family tree

Some people hesitate to begin searching their family history out of fear they may uncover embarrassing information. Others relish finding stories about scandals and scamps.

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Irish Census substitutes

Have you exhausted all possibilities for finding your ancestors in 19th century Irish records? Maybe not.